Welfare
 

DBS Checks - Information

ASSOCIATION OF RUNNING CLUBS
PROTECTION POLICY FOR YOUNG AND VULNERABLE PEOPLE

For Printable PDF version click here (111KB)

 
 

INDEX

 
Policy Statement  
1.1
2.0
2.1
2.1.1
2.1.2
2.1.3
2.1.4
2.1.5
2.1.6
2.2
2.2.1
2.2.2
2.2.3
3.0
3.1
3.1.1
3.1.2
3.1.3
3.1.4
3.2 
3.2.1
4.0
4.1
5.0
5.1
5.2
5.2.1
5.2.2
5.2.3
5.2.4
5.2.5
5.2.6
5.4
5.4.1
5.4.2
5.4.3
5.4.4
5.4.5
5.4.6
6.0
Key principles
Protection in Running
Recruitment of volunteers and
staff
Selection
Interviewing

References
Disclosure & Barring Service (DBS)
Appointing volunteers and staff
After the appointment   
Promoting best practice  
The essentials
Risk management  
Relationships of trust 
Poor Practice and Abuse
Particular Groups vulnerable to abuse       
Young people with disabilities         
Young people from minority ethnic groups
Young people who take on leadership roles
Reducing the potential for abuse 
Dealing with bullying           
Taking a proactive approach  
Responsibility for Protection in Running
The Club Welfare Officer              
Responding to Concerns Allegations and Disclosures
What to do if a young person discloses to you
ARC Reporting Procedures                      
Dealing with possible poor practice in a running club
Distinguishing between abuse and poor practice 
Flow Chart 1 Poor practice in a running club
Flow Chart 2 Abuse in a running club
Concerns outside of a running club 
Flow Chart 3 Concerns outside the running club 
ARC Case Management System
Possible outcomes               
Whistle – blowing          
Appeals                     
Complaints procedures                 
Allegations of previous abuse  
Providing support 
Appendices         
Appendix 1 Club Protection Policy for Young and Vulnerable People 
Appendix 2 Protection Policy Cornerstones 

Appendix 3 ARC Rules Young and Vulnerable Person Protection 
Appendix 4 Signs and Indicators of Abuse    
Appendix 5 Club Welfare Officer – Fit and Proper Person Check List 
Appendix 6 Referral and Information Form for submission to ARC

 

 

ASSOCIATION OF RUNNING CLUBS
PROTECTING YOUNG AND VULNERABLE PEOPLE

PROTECTION POLICY for YOUNG AND VULNERABLE PEOPLE

POLICY STATEMENT

The Association of Running Clubs regards the welfare of all young people and vulnerable adults to be of paramount importance. In order to protect them from abuse, the Association is committed to taking all necessary steps to provide a safe environment for them to participate in running activities held under the auspices of the Association. To this end, the Association will establish, operate, review and update procedures :

Everyone, whether employee or volunteer, involved with young and vulnerable people within running has a responsibility to follow these procedures; this includes acting as specified in the procedures if they have reason to believe such a person has been or is in danger of being harmed.

DEFINITIONS
Young People’ Any person under the age of 18
‘Vulnerable People’ Any person aged 18 or over who

·        is in need of assistance by reason of mental, physical or learning disability, age or illness and who;

·        is unable to take care of him or herself or unable to protect him or herself against significant harm or serious exploitation which may be occasioned by the acts or omissions of other people.

‘Association of Running Clubs (ARC)’ The Governing body for Road Running Clubs in England also an affiliating body for clubs who engage in cross country running, trail running, fell running, walking and track and field athletics.

1.1    Key principles

·        The welfare of the young or vulnerable person is the most important consideration.

·        All young and vulnerable people must be protected from abuse regardless of their gender, sexual orientation, disability, racial origin or religious beliefs.

·        All suspicions and allegations of abuse will be taken seriously and responded to rapidly and in an appropriate manner.

·        Working in partnership with other organisations, young and vulnerable people  and their parents and carers is vital

ARC will work in partnership with the Police, Social Services Departments, and local Safeguarding Children’s Boards (LSCB) and Committees (ACPC) in accordance with their procedures. This is essential so that these organisations can carry out their statutory duties to investigate concerns and protect young and vulnerable people .

Everyone must be clear how to report a concern about the welfare of a young or vulnerable person. This means following the guidelines set out in this policy.

 

Section 2.0 - Protection in Running

2.1 Recruitment of volunteers and staff who may work with young or vulnerable people.

Grassroots running wouldn’t exist without the help of many thousands of volunteers. 

However, we mustn’t lose sight of the fact that anyone may have the potential to abuse young or vulnerable people. Therefore all reasonable steps must be taken to ensure unsuitable people are prevented from working with young or vulnerable people. Careful recruitment and selection procedures will help to screen out those who are not suitable to work with the young or vulnerable.

2.1.1 Selection

·        Use application forms to collect information on each applicant

·        Ensure that more than one club member looks at each application form

·        Ask for identification documents to confirm the identity of the applicant

e.g. passport or driving licence.

2.1.2 Interviewing

The interview will enable the club to explore further the information provided in the application form. The questions to be asked should be decided in advance and should provide the applicant with the opportunity to tell of his previous experience and say   how they would handle situations.

It’s important to find out about an applicant’s technical capabilities and it is also necessary to confirm their commitment to the welfare of the young and vulnerable. Here are some examples of questions that could be used to discover this information:

2.1.3 References

Request at least two references from people who are not related to the applicant. One reference should be associated with the applicant’s place of work and, if possible, one that demonstrates the individual has been involved in sport . References should be followed up prior to any offer of appointment being made. If the references raise any concerns you are advised to contact ARC for advice and guidance.

2.1.4 Disclosure & Barring Service (DBS) disclosures

DBS checks are a tool in the recruitment procedure. A DBS Enhanced Disclosure reveals a person’s recorded offences. It may indicate that a person is not suitable to work with young or vulnerable people, for example if they have a history of sexual offending or dealing in drugs. It could also reveal that further investigations are required, for example if the person has a history of racist offences.

ARC will take into account the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act and only consider offences which are relevant to the care, supervision and training of young and vulnerable people.

The results of disclosures are sent directly to the person applying for the disclosure. The applicant must then show the disclosure result to an official of his club. ARC should be advised of disclosures which reveal relevant offences and ARC will then decide whether or not the applicant is suitable to work with children or vulnerable persons.

ARC have arranged a facility to handle DBS checks. DBS Disclosure Application Forms can be obtained from the Secretary of ARC.

2.1.5 Appointing volunteers and staff

Clubs should consider all the information they receive via the confirmation of identity, the application form, the references and the DBS Enhanced Disclosure. This information should be considered alongside the outcome of the interview to make a decision as to whether or not to accept the applicant into their club.

2.1.6 After the appointment

Once a new volunteer has been recruited follow up action must be taken:

2.2 Promoting best practice

2.2.1 The essentials

Every running club must have a policy for the protection of young and vulnerable people. All club members must understand the policy. This policy is the foundation of a good club. By adopting the ARC’s Protection Policy for Young and Vulnerable People (see Appendix 1) and implementing the key policies and procedures outlined below, best practice will become common practice.

Policies check list

·        Young and vulnerable people policy statement

·        Selection and recruitment policy

·        A whistle-blowing policy

·        Anti bullying policy

·        Equality policy

·        Codes of conduct for coaches.

·        Health and safety policy

Procedures check list

·        Club Welfare Officer appointed

·        Procedures for reporting concerns about the welfare of a young or vulnerable person

·        Complaints and disciplinary procedures

·        A system for gathering parental consent

·        Information for parents and carers

·        Travel and overnight stay procedures

·        A means for young people to express their views and have them heard

·        For further guidance on how to implement the important policies  (see Appendix 2)

 

2.2.2        Risk management

When planning trips you need to assess the risks. You should consider the following:            

·        What are the ages involved?

·        Are there any special needs within the group?

·        Is it a mixed grouping?

·        Do you require someone who has first aid training?

It’s important to also consider your familiarity with the venue. Local sports centres will have guidelines on use and types of facilities, which you may or may not have access to. Also be mindful of social activities at the venue, which may or may not be known to you.

The principles for assessing potential risks remain the same whatever the activity, therefore you need to consider these. You must decide what ratio of adults to young  or vulnerable people you consider to be appropriate to ensure their safety.

If the group is aged over eight years there should always be two adults and a minimum of one adult to ten children.

An adult is anyone over the age of 18. You may have volunteers who are not yet 18. They cannot be considered an adult legally, therefore this affects the ratio of adults to young people. However you could ask parents to come along in such circumstances. You should consider the experience of the adults involved.
 

2.2.3        Relationships of trust

The influence an older person has over someone attending a group activity cannot be underestimated. If there is a competitive aspect to the activity and the older person is responsible for the young person’s success or failure to some extent, then the dependency of the younger member upon the older will be increased. It is therefore important for volunteers to recognise the responsibility they must exercise in ensuring that they do not abuse their position of trust.

Genuine relationships do occur between different levels of volunteers and participants in a group, however no intimate relationship should begin whilst the volunteer is in a position of trust over them.

ARC acknowledges that intimate relationships between teenagers take place and often no harm comes from them. However, it is also acknowledged that young people who suffer abuse often do so at the hands of other young people.

Remember: young people aged 16 –18 can legally consent to some types of sexual activity; however, in some provisions of legislation (under the Children’s Act 1989) they are classified as children.

ARC is currently awaiting the outcome of consultation re the Sexual Offences Act 2003 which currently applies to teachers to see if this law is also applied to coaches.

“It is an offence for a person aged 18 or over to involve a child under that age in sexual activity where he or she is in a specified position of trust in relation to that child. This includes those who care for, advise, supervise or train children and young people (Sexual Offences Act 2003)”

It is a breach of ARC Rules (see Appendix 3) for a coach to engage in an intimate or inappropriate relationship with a young person.

 

Section 3.0 – Poor Practice and Abuse

Young and vulnerable person abuse is a very emotive and difficult subject. It is important to understand the feelings involved but not allow them to interfere with our judgement about any action to be taken. It is also important that young and vulnerable person abuse and young and vulnerable person protection are openly discussed as this  creates an environment where people are more aware of the issues and sensitive to the needs of young and vulnerable people. Open discussions also create environments that deter abusers.

The abuse of young and vulnerable people can occur anywhere. This includes sport, cultural, leisure, religious and care environments and on the transport to and from these places. Recent inquiries have also indicated that abuse which takes place within a public setting is rarely a one-off event. This means that if abuse is detected, it is highly unlikely to be the first time it has happened. It is therefore crucial that all allegations and suspicions are treated seriously and appropriate actions taken. A sport that tries to identify and report abuse creates a safer culture for young and vulnerable people.

Allegations may relate to poor practice where an adult’s or a peer’s behaviour is inappropriate and may be causing concern to a young or vulnerable person within a running setting. Poor practice includes any behaviour that contravenes Codes of Conduct, infringes an individual’s rights and/or reflects a failure to fulfil the highest standards of care. Poor practice is unacceptable in running and will be treated seriously with appropriate actions taken. Sometimes a young or vulnerable person may not be aware that practice is poor or abusive and they may tolerate behaviour without complaint. Examples of this is a child with a disability who is used to being excluded from activities or a bullied young person who is used to being mocked. Children may also be used to their race being abused . This does not make it acceptable.

Many young people will lack the skills or confidence to complain and it is therefore extremely important that adults in the club speak up for the young people when this is necessary.

For information about the categories of abuse and signs and indicators (see Appendix 4)

 

3.1 Particular Groups vulnerable to abuse

This young and vulnerable persons protection policy is applicable to all and the same actions should be taken regardless of the needs and background of the young or vulnerable person. ARC knows however that some young people are disadvantaged by their experiences and would want to emphasise the following

 

3.1.1 Young people with disabilities

Young people with disabilities are additionally vulnerable because they may:

·        Lack a wide network of friends who could support them

·        Have significant communication difficulties- this may include limited verbal communication, they may use sign language or other forms of non verbal communication.

·        Have a reduced capacity to resist either verbally or physically

·        Not be believed

·        Depend on the abuser for their involvement in sport

·        Lack access to peers to discover what is acceptable behaviour

·        Have medical needs that are used to explain abuse

·        Require intimate care

 

3.1.2 Young people from minority ethnic groups

Young people from minority ethnic groups are additionally vulnerable because they may be:

 

3.1.3 Young people who take on leadership roles

Taking on a leadership role within running should be an enjoyable and learning experience. However coaches, runners and parents often lose sight of the fact that an individual in a leadership role who is under 18 is legally a young person. It is important that clubs realise that they must ensure that other young people behave appropriately towards young people who take on such roles. Overly critical and unsupportive responses may constitute verbal or emotional abuse.

 

3.1.4 Reducing the potential for abuse

Bearing in mind that young and vulnerable people are disadvantaged by these and other experiences, it is important for clubs to be extra vigilant in creating a safe culture, including:

 

It may be necessary to ask specialist agencies for help and advice in order to include some  young people in running. It should be seen as a strength of the club to approach families, Education, Health, Social Services, voluntary agencies and community groups for advice on including and protecting particular children.

 

3.2 Dealing with bullying

No one deserves to be the victim of bullying. Everyone has the right to be treated with respect. ARC will not accept or condone bullying in running and has defined bullying as a category of abuse. It is the responsibility of everyone in running, whatever their role, to ensure that bullying is dealt with in an appropriate manner.

Bullying can be defined as:

Bullying can take place anywhere but is more likely to take place where there is inadequate supervision.

A bully in running can be:

·        A coach or manager who has a win at-all-costs philosophy

·        A parent who pushes too hard

·        A child or young person intimidating another

The damage inflicted by bullying can be underestimated. It can cause much distress to  young people, in some cases affecting their health and development. In extreme circumstances it can lead to self-harm. For more information on developing an anti-bullying policy (see Appendix 2)

 

3.2.1 Taking a proactive approach

 

Section 4.0- Responsibility for Protection in Running

We all have a moral and legal responsibility for the safety and protection of  young  and vulnerable people within running. However, there are people designated who take additional responsibility for protection of the young and vulnerable with the aim of making running as safe as possible for all concerned.

The title “designated person” is a term that applies to an individual that is appointed by clubs. The designated person for young and vulnerable person protection should be clearly identified in every club.

The designated person holds a position of responsibility. ARC requires that before appointment, the potential designated person is considered to be a “fit and proper person” to hold the position as defined in Appendix 5. ARC also requires that all designated persons are approachable and have a child-centred approach.

The designated person needs to attend a Child Protection Course and must have completed a DBS Enhanced Disclosure.

 

4.1 The Club Welfare Officer

Every club who have young or vulnerable people in their care must appoint a Club Welfare Officer (CWO) who will also be part of the Club Management Committee. The CWO will promote best practice throughout the club and will deal with poor practice concerns in accordance with the club’s disciplinary process. Matters of a more worrying nature must be referred to the ARC Child Protection Officer (CPO). Confidentiality regarding concerns must be maintained on a strictly “need to know “ basis. Each CWO will be expected to:

 

Section 5.0- Responding to Concerns, Allegations and Disclosures*

The term disclosure in this context is used to describe the sharing of child protection concerns by one individual to another and it is not the Disclosure & Barring Service's formal record of an individual’s convictions

There is a legal and moral duty to report any concerns about a young or vulnerable person. ARC will support anyone who, in good faith, reports his or her concern that a person is, or may be abusing a young or vulnerable person, even if that concern is shown to be unfounded.

The following guidelines apply whether or not the young or vulnerable person is involved in running. You must follow the ARC procedures for any concerns that are related to your running club activities.

Concerns may arise because

·        A young or vulnerable person informs you directly that he or she is concerned about someone’s behaviour towards them (see 5.1 & 5.2.1)

·        You become aware, through your own observations or through a third party, of possible abuse occurring (see 5.2)

Most suspicions of abuse  follow observation of changes in the young or vulnerable person’s behaviour, appearance, attitude or relationship with others. Your suspicions may develop over time (see Appendix 4 Signs and Indicators of Abuse)

Where the concern does not involve individuals in club activities, the matter should be reported to local Social Services or the local Police (see 5.2.6)

 

5.1 What to do if a  young or vulnerable person discloses to you

If a young or vulnerable person informs you directly that they are concerned about someone’s behaviour towards them, this is known as a disclosure. The person receiving the disclosure should:

·        React calmly so as not to frighten the young or vulnerable person

·        Tell the young or vulnerable person that he or she is not to blame and he or she was right to inform

·        Take what the young or vulnerable person says seriously

·        If the young or vulnerable person needs immediate medical treatment, take them to hospital or telephone for an ambulance, inform doctors of concerns and ensure that they  are aware that this is a young or vulnerable person protection issue.

·        Ensure the immediate safety of the young or vulnerable person.

·        Avoid leading the young or vulnerable person and keep any questions to the  minimum. Ask only what is necessary to obtain a clear understanding of what has been said.

·        Re-assure the young or vulnerable person but do not make promises of confidentiality or outcome. This might not be feasible in the light of subsequent developments,

·        In the event of suspicion of sexual abuse do not let the young or vulnerable person bathe or shower until given permission to do so. Washing can destroy valuable evidence.

·        Inform the parents/carers immediately unless you have specific reason not to e.g the young person has named the parent/carer as the abuser. If this is the case then contact  
 the designated person. If he is unavailable contact local Social Services or the Police for guidance.

 

5.2    ARC Reporting Procedures

Whether informed directly by a young or vulnerable person, via a third party, or through your own observation at your club activities, you should follow the ARC Procedures outlined below and in the flow charts   FC1,    FC2,    and   FC3

·        Ensure the immediate safety of  the  young or vulnerable person.

·        If the young or vulnerable person needs immediate medical treatment, take them to hospital or telephone for an ambulance, inform doctors of concerns and ensure that they are aware that this is a young or vulnerable person protection issue

·        Report the concerns to the designated person for young or vulnerable person protection , unless the concern is about the designated person (see below)

·        If the designated person is not available, or the concern is about this person, report your concerns directly to the local Social Services, the local Police or the NSPCC Child Protection Helpline

·        These agencies will advise you whether a formal referral to Social Services is necessary and what further action you might need to take. If you are advised to make a formal referral make it clear to Social Services or the Police that this is a young or vulnerable person protection referral.

·        All police forces have dedicated Child Protection Teams (CPT’s) which deal with allegations of abuse within the family setting and by people in a position of trust. In a real emergency dial 999 .

·        Remember if the concern is about someone involved within your club and you are unable to contact the designated person, then you should inform the ARC CPO and let them know what action, in line with ARC procedures, you have taken.

 

5.2.1   Dealing with possible poor practice or abuse in a running club setting

The flow diagrams    FC1,    FC2,    and   FC3   explain how to deal with a concern about possible poor practice or young or vulnerable person abuse within a running club setting. The following definitions relating to poor practice and abuse will help you to decide whether the issue is likely to be poor practice or abuse. If you are at all unsure  seek guidance from your CWO or ARC CPO as appropriate.

If you decide the concern relates to poor practice follow chart 1 -  FC1 . If you decide that the concern relates to abuse use chart 2 -  FC2

 

5.2.2        Distinguishing between young or vulnerable person abuse and poor practice

Concerns identified as young or vulnerable person abuse will fall within the following five categories:

Physical Abuse

A young or vulnerable person is physically hurt or injured by an adult or an adult gives alcohol or drugs to a young person

Neglect

 A child’s basic physical needs are consistently not met or they are regularly left alone or unsupervised

Emotional Abuse

Persistent criticism , denigrating or putting unrealistic expectations on a young or vulnerable person

Sexual Abuse

An adult or peer uses a young or vulnerable person to meet their own sexual needs

Bullying

Persistent or repeated hostile and intimidating behaviour towards a  young or vulnerable person

Incidents of poor practice occur when the needs of  young and vulnerable people are not afforded sufficient priority with the result that their welfare is affected. Some examples are :

·        When insufficient care is taken to avoid injuries (e.g by excessive training or inappropriate training for the age, maturity, experience and ability of the young people)

·        Giving continued and unnecessary preferential treatment to individuals and regularly or unfairly rejecting others (e.g singling out and focusing on the more talented runners )

·        Ignoring health and safety guidelines

·        Allowing abusive or concerning practices to go unreported (e.g a coach who ridicules and criticizes runners after a poor race)

Please note

 

5.2.3   Flow chart 1; dealing with possible poor practice in a running club setting

1              You become aware of a poor practice and/or possible abuse situation

2            ·        Stay calm

·        If  young or vulnerable person is present reassure him or her they are not to blame

·        Don’t make promises of confidentiality or outcome

·        Keep questions to a minimum

3                Is the concern poor practice or young or vulnerable person abuse ?

4                For clarification concerning poor practice concerns see . If the concern is young or vulnerable person abuse follow flow chart 2 -  FC2 , if the concern is poor practice -

5                Contact the CWO who will either

·      Follow club procedures for a first report of poor practice, complete and submit the ARC Information and Referral Form to the ARC CPO for information only

·      Seek advice from ARC CPO

6                Where appropriate the ARC CPO will either

·    Give advice for the CWO to action

·    Monitor the behaviour of individual or club as required

·    Gather additional evidence

 

5.2.4        Flow chart 2; dealing with possible young or vulnerable person abuse in a
   running club setting

1          You become aware of a poor practice and/or abuse situation

2        ·         Stay calm

·        If  young or vulnerable person is present reassure him or her they are not to blame

·        Don’t make promises of confidentiality or outcome

·        Keep questions to a minimum

3      Is the concern young or vulnerable person abuse ? Yes

        Is the young or vulnerable person in need of medical attention ?

 If Yes Go to 4   If No go to 5

4          ·       Take the  young or vulnerable person to hospital or telephone for an
                   ambulance

·        Inform the doctor of your concerns in relation to young or vulnerable 
 person protection issues (doctor will take appropriate action )

5       Refer to the Police and Social services for investigation. They will advise on  

  contacting parents

6          Inform ARC CPO as soon as possible.

7          Also make a factual record of events, utilising the ARC Referral and Information Form  (Appendix 6). Forward a copy of the information recorded, including any

          action taken, to the ARC CPO.

  

5.2.5        Concerns outside of a running club setting

You may receive information regarding the welfare of a young or vulnerable person  who is involved in running, yet the concern itself does not relate to someone within the sport. In these circumstances (e.g the concern relates to the young or vulnerable person’s home or a social setting other than running ) you need to follow the ARC procedures outlined below

 

5.2.6        Flow chart 3; dealing with concerns outside of a running club setting

(a)    You become aware of a poor practice and/or possible abuse situation outside of a running club setting involving a young  or vulnerable person who participates in running club activities

(b)   Is the young or vulnerable person in need of medical attention

(c)    If YES go to (d )   If NO go to (e )

(d)     ·        Take the young or vulnerable person to hospital or telephone for an ambulance

·        Inform doctor of your concerns in relation to young or vulnerable person protection issues

·        The doctor will take appropriate action

                                 (e ) Can you contact the CWO immediately ?

                                         If YES go to (f) If NO go to (g)

(f)     Inform the CWO immediately and they will (go to (h) )

(g)    Inform the CWO as soon as possible. Also

                                 (h)       ·  Seek advice immediately from the local Social Services, the Police or the NSPCC Helpline

·  Take action as advised by these agencies, including advice on contacting parents

·  Make a factual record of events using the ARC Information and Referral Form, and forward to the ARC CPO

·  Indicate clearly whether or not the allegation refers to someone involved in running in any capacity

 

5.3      Recording of suspicions, concerns or events

 

5.4      The ARC Case Management System

In case of young or vulnerable person abuse or alleged young or vulnerable person abuse. The ARC Case Management System will

Decisions about reinstatement may be difficult. ARC advised by the Police and Social Services and/or the NSPCC, will reach a decision based upon the available information. This could suggest that, on a balance of probability, it is more likely than not that the allegation is true, regardless of any decisions relating to criminal prosecutions. The welfare of young and vulnerable people should always remain paramount.

 

5.4.1        Possible outcomes

Cases of poor practice will be investigated by the ARC CPO. Cases of young or vulnerable person abuse (having been dealt with by the statutory agencies) will be investigated by the ARC CPO who may refer the case to a Sub- Committee comprising three members of the ARC Committee. In these circumstances, the following outcomes are possible :

 

5.4.2        “Whistle- blowing”

Whistle-blowing is an early warning system. It is about revealing and raising concerns over misconduct within a club .

Any person or young person with concerns about a colleague can use whistle-blowing by contacting the ARC CPO.c/o 19 Sheephouse Green, Wotton, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6QW Telephone 01306 888886

Alternatively you can go direct to the Police or Social Services and report your concerns there.

 

5.4.3        Appeals

The appeals procedure is available to anyone who is subject to a decision made by the Disciplinary Sub Committee of ARC. Every individual and organisation wishing to appeal against decisions by ARC must do so in writing to be received by the Secretary ARC, 19 Sheephouse Green, Wotton, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6QW within 14 days of the date of notification of the decision appealed against. The appeal must identify the specific decision(s) being appealed and set out the grounds of appeal and the reasons why it would be substantially unfair not to alter the decision. The ARC Disciplinary Appeal Panel will exclude anyone who sat on the initial decision-making panel and will consist of an independent Chair and two other members.

 

5.4.4        Complaints procedures

A complaint may be made by an individual who has been the subject of a poor practice or young or vulnerable person concern that has been dealt with by the ARC CPO. Please note, any matters relating to appeals Disciplinary Hearings, Suspensions and the Rules of the Association and the Rules of the Sport will be separately dealt with under established procedures and are not the subject of a complaint.

In the first instance the complainant is required to contact the Secretary of ARC. It is hoped that he will be able to resolve the complainants concerns and give appropriate assurances regarding the management of the case in question. A record of this resolution will be made and copied to the complainant.

If the complainant is dissatisfied with the response and wishes to take the matter further, they are required to put the matter in writing to the Secretary of ARC within 28 days of the known outcome of the informal communication with the Secretary. The matter will then be considered by a Sub Committee of three Committee members of ARC.

 

5.4.5        Allegations of previous abuse

Allegations of  abuse may be made some time after the event (e.g by an adult who was abused as a child about a volunteer who is still currently working with young  or vulnerable people). Where such an allegation is made, you should inform the ARC CPO.

ARC will, following consultation, take the necessary action. This is because other  young or vulnerable people, either within running club or outside, may be at risk from this person and anyone who has been abused has the right to be heard at any time. This position is reinforced by UK legislation and guidance.

 

5.4.6        Providing support

ARC will support anyone who, in good faith, reports his or her concern that a colleague is, or may be, abusing a young or vulnerable person, even if that concern is proved to be unfounded, in the following ways:

Consideration will be given to what support may be appropriate for young and vulnerable people, parents or carers, volunteers and members of staff during and after poor practice and young and vulnerable person referrals to ARC.

It is never easy to respond to a child or vulnerable adult who tells you that they are being abused. You may well be feeling upset and worried yourself. Confidentiality is paramount. However, ARC acknowledges that having received a disclosure, individuals may have a need for some support. ARC has a list of Contacts which provides information on support groups and helplines for those who have received a disclosure.

Every effort will be made to ensure that any young or vulnerable person who has been subject to poor practice or abuse, and their parents or carers, will be given support from the appropriate agencies. A list of independent support groups  and helplines is available from ARC for those who have experienced abuse.

Section 6.0 Appendices

Appendix 1-  Club Protection Policy for Young and Vulnerable People

INSERT NAME                          Running Club

 

1 Young and Vulnerable Person Protection Policy

_________________________________Running Club acknowledges its responsibility to safeguard the welfare of every young and vulnerable person who has been entrusted to its care and is committed to working to provide a safe environment for all of its members. A child or young person is anyone under the age of 18 engaged in any running club activity. A vulnerable adult is defined as any person aged 18 or over who

·        Is in need of assistance by reason of mental, physical or learning disability, age or illness and who;

·        Is unable to take care of him or herself or unable to protect him or herself against significant harm or serious exploitation which may be occasioned by the act or omissions of other people.

We subscribe to the ARC Protection Policy for Young and Vulnerable People and the Procedures and Guidelines included therein. We endorse and adopt the Policy Statement contained in that document

2 The key principles of the ARC  Protection Policy for Young and Vulnerable People are that:

3 We recognise that every young or vulnerable person who  participates in our sport should be able to take part in a safe environment and be protected from poor practice and abuse.__________________ Running Club acknowledges that this is the responsibility of every adult involved in our club

4_____________________Running Club has a role to play in protecting the welfare of all young and vulnerable persons by guarding them from physical, sexual or emotional harm and from neglect or bullying. It is accepted that the ARC Regulations (see Appendix 3) apply to everyone in our sport whether in a paid or voluntary capacity. This applies whether you are a volunteer, helper, coach, or club official.

We endorse and adopt ARC’s Protection Policy for Young and Vulnerable People and the best Practice Guidelines for recruiting volunteers and will :

All current______________________Running Club members with direct access to  young and vulnerable people will be required to complete a DBS Enhanced Disclosure. If there are concerns regarding an individual who is already involved or who has approached us to become part of

____________Running Club guidance will be sought from ARC. It is accepted that ARC will consider the relevance and significance of the information obtained via the DBS Unit and that all decisions will be made in the best interests of young and vulnerable people.

It is accepted that ARC aims to prevent people with a history of relevant and significant offending from having contact with young and vulnerable people and training with young or vulnerable people. This is to prevent direct sexual or physical harm to young or vulnerable people and to minimise the risk of “grooming” within running.

5_______________________Running Club supports ARC’s Whistle-blowing Policy. Any adult or young person with concerns about a colleague can whistle-blow by writing to the Secretary, ARC, 19 Sheephouse Green, Wotton, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6QW or by telephoning the Secretary on 01306 888886 or by going direct to the Police, Social Services or the NSPCC.____________________________Running Club encourages everyone to know about it and utilise it if necessary.

6______________________Running Club has appointed a Club Welfare Officer (CWO) in line with ARC’s role profile. The post holder will or has attended a suitable course to provide training. The CWO is the first point of contact for all club members and parents/carers regarding concerns for the welfare of any young or vulnerable person. They liaise directly with the ARC CPO and will be familiar with the procedures for referring any concerns. They will also play a proactive role in increasing an awareness of poor practice and abuse amongst club members.

7  We acknowledge and endorse ARC’s identification of bullying as a category of abuse. Bullying of any kind is not acceptable at our club. If bullying does occur, all runners or parents/ carers should be able to inform and know that incidents will be dealt with promptly. Incidents need to be reported to the CWO or member of the committee or alternatively in cases of serious bullying contact the ARC CPO.

8 Codes of conduct for young people, parents/carers and coaches have been implemented by______________________Running Club. In order to validate these codes of conduct the club has clear sanctions to deal with any misconduct at club level and acknowledges the possibility of potential sanctions which may be implemented by ARC in more serious circumstances. All prospective members under 18 years of age will be informed of these codes.

9 Further advice on Child and Vulnerable Adult Protection matters can be obtained from

 

Appendix 2- Protection Policy Corner Stones

 

Anti-bullying policy for running clubs

Statement of intent

We are committed to providing a caring and safe environment for all our members so they can participate in running in a secure atmosphere. Bullying of any kind is unacceptable at our club. If bullying does occur, all club members or parents should be able to inform and know that incidents will be dealt with promptly and effectively.  This means that anyone who knows that bullying is happening is expected to tell the Club Welfare Officer or any committee member.

What is bullying ?

Bullying is the use of aggression with the intention of hurting another person. Bullying results in pain and distress to the victim.

Bullying can be:

·        Emotional- being unfriendly, excluding (emotionally and physically),  tormenting, (e.g hiding clothes, threatening gestures )

·        Physical- pushing, kicking, hitting, punching or any use of violence

·        Verbal-name-calling, sarcasm, spreading rumours, teasing

·        Racist- racial taunts, graffiti, gestures

·        Sexual- unwanted physical contact or sexually abusive comments

·        Homophobic- because of, or focussing on the issue of sexuality

Why is it important to respond to bullying ?

Bullying hurts. No one deserves to be a victim of bullying. Everybody has the right to be treated with respect. Individuals who are bullying need to learn different ways of behaving. The impact upon a young person can be devastating and in some cases affect all aspects of their life, in extreme circumstances it can lead to suicide threats or even attempts.

This club has a responsibility to respond promptly and effectively to issues of bullying.

Objectives of this policy

Signs and indicators

A young person may indicate by signs or behaviour that he or she is being bullied. Adults should be aware of these possible signs and that they should investigate if a child;

In more extreme cases

These signs and behaviours may indicate other problems, but bullying should be considered a possibility and should be investigated.

Procedures

  1. Report bullying incidents to the CWO or a member of the club committee or contact the ARC CPO

  2. In cases of serious bullying, the incidents will be referred to the ARC CPO for advice.

  3. Parents should be informed and will be asked to come to a meeting to discuss the problem

  4. If necessary and appropriate, the Police will be consulted

  5. The bullying behaviour or threats of bullying must be investigated and the bullying stopped quickly

  6. An attempt will be made to help the bully (bullies) change their behaviour

  7. If mediation fails and the bullying is seen to continue the club will institute disciplinary action under the club constitution

Recommended club action

If the club decides it is appropriate for them to deal with the situation, they should follow the procedure outlined below

  1. Reconciliation by getting the parties together. It may be that a genuine apology solves the problem

  2. If this fails/is not appropriate, a small panel (made up from the chairman, CWO, secretary, committee members) should meet with parent/carer and child alleging bullying to get details of the allegation. Minutes should be taken for clarity, which should be agreed by all as a true account.

  3. The same three members should meet with the alleged bully and parents/carer and ask them to give their view of the allegation. Minutes should again be taken and agreed by all as a true account.

  4. If bullying has in their view taken place, the individual should be warned and put on notice of further action i.e temporary or permanent suspension if the bullying continues. Consideration should be given as to whether a reconciliation meeting between parties is possible at this time.

  5. In some cases the parent of the bully or bullied club member can be asked to attend training sessions. The club committee should monitor the situation for a  period to ensure bullying is not being repeated.

  6. All coaches involved with both individuals should be made aware of the concerns and outcome of the process.

In the case of adults reported to be bullying anyone within the club under 18

1.      The ARC CPO should always be informed and will advise on action to be taken

2.      It is anticipated that in most cases involving a team manager or coach, some training may be recommended.

3.      More serious cases may be referred to the Police and/or Social Services.

Prevention

·      The club will have a written constitution, which includes what is acceptable and proper behaviour for all members of which the anti-bullying policy is one part

·      All club members and parents will sign to accept the constitution upon joining the club

·      The CWO will raise awareness about bullying and why it matters, and if issues of bullying arise in the club, will consider meeting with members to discuss the issue openly .

 

Guidance for developing a club health and safety policy

Having a Club Health and Safety Policy means applying common sense to use of your’s and other’s facilities and to the routes that you use for your club runs to ensure that you have a safe environment in which to carry out the club’s training activities.

If you are using local authority facilities e.g local sports centre or school, there will always be a health and safety policy in place for these facilities. It is your responsibility to ask for the regulations and best practice guidance relating to usage of these facilities.

Make sure you find out what your club is responsible for and what the provider is responsible for. This should be clearly indicated when hiring a facility.

Recommended action

·        Make sure the club’s management committee is aware of the need for procedures relating to health and safety and takes ownership of this responsibility

·        Ensure the club has civil liability insurance and follows the terms of the insurance policy.

·        The club’s management committee should decide on a policy regarding the wearing of luminous vests or clothing on runs at night.

·        Establish those individuals who have a recognised emergency first aid qualification within the club

·        Keep all events staged by the club under review and if necessary perform a risk assessment and keep the documents on file.

·        Establish emergency procedures within the club and ensure all coaches/officials are aware of these procedures.

·        Have an Incident/Accident Report Form.

 

Guidance for developing a clubs complaints and disciplinary policy

The disciplinary process

Many clubs will already have in place codes of conduct for club members, coaches and officials. Codes of conduct can only be effective if there is a disciplinary process to support them. It is essential that the club is fair and consistent.

The following options can be considered;

·        Verbal warning

·        Written warning

·        Exclusion from a specified number of training sessions

·        Exclusion from the club for the remainder of the season

·        Exclusion from the club for the future season

Once a decision has been taken it is not easy to reverse the decision. It is much simpler to add an additional sanction or increase the number or period of time being utilised.

Having a complaints process

If you have clearly stated and communicated the club’s philosophy, what it can offer to and what it expects from club members and coaches , this will limit potential complaints.

Most complaints can be dealt with by referring individuals to club policies and procedures. However, where there are complaints which cannot be satisfied via these routes there needs to be a procedure for dealing with these.

The following options can be considered:

 

Codes of conduct for coaches

Coaches

Coaches have an increased responsibility when involved in coaching young people. The health, safety, welfare and moral education of young people are a first priority, before the achievement of the reputation of the club, school, coach or parent.

Code of Conduct for Coaches

1.      Coaches must respect the rights, dignity and worth of each and every person

2.      Coaches must place the well-being and safety of each runner above all other considerations, including the development of performance

3.      Coaches must adhere to all guidelines laid down by the Rules of the Sport

4.      Coaches must develop an appropriate working relationship with each runner based on mutual trust and respect.

5.      Coaches must not exert undue influence to obtain personal benefit or reward.

6.      Coaches must encourage and guide runners to accept responsibility for their own behaviour and performance.

7.      Coaches must ensure that the activities they direct or advocate are appropriate for the age, maturity, experience and ability of the runners.

8.      Coaches should, at the outset, clarify with the runners (and where appropriate, the parents) exactly what is expected of them and also what they are entitled to expect from their coach.

9.      Coaches must co-operate fully with other specialists (e.g other coaches, officials, doctors, physiotherapists) in the best interests of the runner.

10.  Coaches must always promote the positive aspects of the sport and never condone violations of the Rules of the Sport, behaviour contrary to the spirit of the Rules of the
 Sport or the use of prohibited substances or techniques.

11.  Coaches must consistently display high standards of behaviour and appearance.

12.  Coaches must not use or tolerate inappropriate language or behaviour.

 

The ARC Equality Policy

Running belongs to, and should be enjoyed by, anyone who wants to participate in it.

ARC’s commitment is to eliminate discrimination whether by reason of gender, sexual orientation, marital status, race, nationality, ethnic origin, colour, religion or belief, ability or disability.

ARC is also committed to promoting equality by treating people fairly and with respect, by recognising that inequalities may exist, by taking steps to address them and by providing access and opportunities for all members of the community.

The following policy should be at the heart of your club’s activities.

 

Equality Policy for clubs

The aim of this policy is to ensure that everyone is treated fairly and with respect and that__________________________Running Club is equally accessible to them all

 

_________________________Running Club is responsible for setting standards and values to apply throughout the club at every level. Running belongs to, and should be enjoyed by anyone who wants to participate in it.

 

________________________Running Clubs commitment is to confront and eliminate discrimination whether by reason of gender, sexual orientation, marital status, race, nationality, ethnic origin, colour, religion or belief, ability or disability and to encourage equal opportunities.

 

______________________Running Club, in all its activities, will not discriminate, or  treat anyone less favourably, on grounds of gender, sexual orientation, marital status, race, nationality, ethnic origin, colour, religion or belief, ability or disability. It means that_______________Running Club will ensure that it treats people fairly and with respect and that it will provide access and opportunities for all members of the community to take part in, and enjoy, its activities.

 

____________________Running Club will not tolerate harassment, bullying, abuse or victimisation of an individual, which for the purposes of this policy and the actions and sanction applicable is regarded as discrimination. This includes sexual or racially based harassment or other discriminatory behaviour, whether physical or verbal.

 

___________________Running Club will work to ensure that such behaviour is met with appropriate action in whatever context it occurs.

We are committed to the development of a programme of ongoing training and awareness raising events and activities in order to promote the eradication of discrimination within the club and within running.

 

_____________________Running Club is committed to a policy of equal treatment of all members and requires all members to abide to these policies and the requirements of the relevant equalities legislation – Race Relations Act 1976, Sex Discrimination Act 1975 and Disability Discrimination Act 1995 as well as any amendment to these acts.

 

__________________Running Club commits itself to the immediate investigation of any claims, when it is brought to their attention, of discrimination on the above grounds and where such is found to be the case, a requirement that the practice stop and sanctions imposed as appropriate.

 

Club Complaints Procedure

In the event that any member feels that he or she has suffered discrimination in any way or that the Club Policies, Rules or Code of Conduct has been broken they should follow the procedures below

1 They should report the matter to the Club Secretary in writing or another member of the committee.

The report should include

·        Details of what, when and where the occurrence took place

·        Any witness statement and names

·        Details of any previous complaints made about the incident, date, when and to whom made

·        Names of any others who have been treated in a similar way

·        A preference for a solution to the incident

2 The Club’s Management Committee will sit for any hearings that are requested

3 The Club’s Management Committee will have the power to;

Any person found to have broken the Club’s Policies or Codes of Conduct.

If the complaint is with regard to the Club’s Management Committee the member has the right to report the discrimination direct to ARC.

 

Appendix 3             ARC Rules

Child protection

1 Any act, statement, conduct or other matter which harms a young or vulnerable person, or poses or may pose a risk of harm to a young or vulnerable person shall constitute behaviour which is improper and brings the sport into disrepute.

2  (a) In these rules the expression “Offence” shall mean any one or more of the offences contained in the Schedules of the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000 and any other criminal offence which reasonably causes the Association to believe that the person accused of the offence poses or may pose a risk of harm to a young or vulnerable person.

(b) All persons in such positions that the Association deems relevant whose normal duties include caring for, training, supervising or being in sole charge of young or vulnerable persons are required to obtain an Enhanced Disclosure from the DBS.

3. Upon receipt by the Association of:

3.1 Notification that an individual has been charged with an Offence; or

3.2 Notification that an individual is the subject of an investigation by the Police, Social Services or any authority relating to an Offence; or

3.3 Any other information which causes the Association reasonably to believe that a person poses or may pose a risk of harm to a young or vulnerable person ;

then the Association shall have the power to order that the individual be suspended from all or any specific activity in the sport for such period and on such terms and conditions as it thinks fit.

4. In reaching its determination as to whether an order under the Association Rules should be made the Association shall give consideration, inter alia, to the following factors:

4.1 Whether a young or vulnerable person is or may be at risk of harm;

4.2 Whether the matters are of a serious nature;

4.3 Whether an order is necessary or desirable to allow the conduct of any investigation by the Association or any other authority or body to proceed unimpeded having regard to the need for any action to be proportionate.

5 The period of an order referred to in 3 above shall not last beyond the date upon which any charge under the Rules of the Association or any Offence is decided or brought to an end.

6 Where an order is impose on an individual under the Rules of the Association, the Association shall bring and conclude any proceedings under the Rules of the Association against the person relating to the matters as soon as reasonably practicable.

7 Where a person is convicted, or is made the subject of a caution in respect of an Offence, that shall constitute a breach of the Rules of the Association and the Association shall have the power to order the suspension of the person from all or any specific activity in the sport for such period (including indefinitely) and on such terms and conditions as it thinks fit.

8 For the purposes of these Rules, the Association shall act through its Committee or sub-committee thereof.

9 Notification in writing of an order referred to above shall be given to the person concerned and/or any club with which he/she is associated as soon as reasonably practicable.

10 The applicable standard of proof shall be the civil standard, of the balance of probability. The more serious the allegation taking into account the nature of the misconduct alleged and the context of the case the greater the burden of evidence required to find the matter proved. Save for matters covered by the ARC Protection Policy for Young and Vulnerable People, where the welfare and protection of young and vulnerable people shall be paramount and the test shall be whether more likely than not.

Appendix 4 – Signs and Indicators of Abuse

What is abuse ?

Where and how does it happen ? Does it really happen in sport ? “Child abuse” is a term used to describe what happens when a person, or group of people harm a child or young person under the age of 18. Child abuse may mean that harm is actively done to the young person, such as beating or burning, or it may refer to neglect where the carers fail to protect the child or young person from harm. The abuser is often an adult, but may also be another young person and occasionally even a child. Usually the abuser has some sort of power over the child or young person, and often knows them well. Abuse can happen anywhere e.g in the family, any institution or group and in any activity where children or young people are present. There is a risk that direct abuse, or neglect, can happen in a running club.

ARC defines abuse into five categories. These are ;

Neglect

Neglect takes place if adults fail to meet a child or young person’s basic physical needs, e.g for food, warmth and clothing, or emotional needs such as attention and affection. It occurs if young people are left alone or inadequately supervised or where they are exposed to danger, injury or extreme weather conditions.

In running, neglect could occur if young people do not have proper supervision, clothing or are allowed or encouraged to run whilst injured. It could occur if a young person’s particular health needs are disregarded before, during, or after a run.

Physical abuse

Physical abuse occurs if people physically hit, burn, poison, shake or in some way hurt or injure young people, or fail to prevent these injuries from happening.

In running, physical abuse could happen where training methods are inappropriate for the developmental age of the young person, where they are allowed to run with an injury or where inappropriate drugs or alcohol are offered or accepted. It would clearly happen if a young person is hit or physically restrained or manhandled by those supervising the running or training session.

Emotional abuse

Emotional abuse includes frequent threatening, taunting or sarcastic behaviour, along withholding affection or being extremely over-protective. It includes racist or sexist behaviour and demeaning initiation ceremonies. It can be inflicted by other young people as well as by adults. Young people who are being abused or bullied in any way will also experience emotional abuse.

In running, coaches or parents emotionally abuse young people if they constantly criticise, abuse their power, or impose unrealistic pressure to perform to a high standard. It may also occur if a club allows members to deride people with disabilities or from minority cultures and use derogatory language about them

Sexual abuse

Sexual abuse occurs if young people are used to meet another person’s sexual needs. This includes any form of sexual behaviour with a young person (by an adult or another young person) the use of sexually-explicit language and jokes, inappropriate touching and exposure to pornographic material.

Sexual abuse can occur in running. For example, where there is inappropriate touching, or where sexually-explicit jokes occur between adults and young people or if indecent images are taken or adapted and placed on child pornography sites.

Bullying

Although anyone can be the target of bullying, young people who are perceived as “different” from the majority may be at greater risk of bullying. This includes young people from minority cultures or young people with disabilities. Victims are often shy and sensitive and perhaps anxious or insecure. Bullying can be defined as;

·        Physical; hitting, kicking and theft

·        Verbal; name calling, constant teasing, sarcasm, racist or homophobic taunts, threats and gestures.

·        Emotional; tormenting, ridiculing, humiliating and ignoring

·        Sexual; unwanted physical contact or sexually abusive comments.

Bullying can take place anywhere, but is more likely to take place where there is inadequate supervision. The bully in running can be the parent who pushes too hard, a coach or manager who has a win-at-all costs philosophy ; a young person intimidating another.

The victim is often weaker and less powerful and the outcome is always painful and distressing.

In an NSPCC survey of young people (2000) bullying was reported to be the most common source of distress and anxiety.

Signs and indicators

Young people are reluctant to tell someone when they are being abused. So it is essential that every adult is aware of the possible signals that a young person’s welfare or safety is being threatened. However, there is rarely a clear sign and you may often have to piece together various snippets of information and rely on your instinct that something does not seem quite right.

You may have one piece of information that, when added to that of others, forms a clear picture of abuse. This is often compared to fitting pieces of a jigsaw together. Only when you have a few pieces can you start to see the true picture.

Remember, it is not your job to decide whether or not a young person is being abused- however it is your responsibility to share your concerns.

Never allow a young person’s disability or cultural difference to explain away concerns.

 

Appendix 5 – Protecting Young and Vulnerable People – Fit and Proper Person Checklist

When appointing a designated person, ensure that you have considered their suitability for this role by checking them against the following criteria.

Essential

Desirable

 

Appendix 6 – Young and Vulnerable Person Protection. Referral and Information Form

Young and Vulnerable Person Protection. Referral and Information Form

 

Completed by………………………………  Position…………………………

 

Referral for Direct Involvement               For Consultation & Advice       For Information Only

 

Case Name………………………………………………………………………

( Accused Person/Club being referred)

 

Position Held…………………………………………………………………..

 

Relationship…………………………. Gender        Male        Female

(To alleged victim)

 

Contact Details………………………………………………………………………

 

Address…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

Phone No…………………………………  Date of Birth…………………

 

Age………………………………………..Ethnic background……………………….

(At time of incident)                                                   ( if known)

 

Name of Alleged Victim/Young person Concerned……………………………………

( If more than one, use Additional Information Form)

 

Age ……………………………………..     Date of Birth………………………..

( At time of incident)

 

Role/Position………………………………Any Disabilities………………………

 

Gender    Male…..        Female…….           Ethnic background……………………

                                                                                          (if known)

 

Contact……………………………………Telephone No………………………..

(Name and address of parent/carer

 

ARC Member Club………………………………………………………………..

(Name and address)

…………………………………………………………………………………….

 

Name of person who originated concern and contact details………………………..

(if applicable/known)

……………………………………………………………………………………….

Relationship to alleged victim……………Relationship to accused……………….

 

 

Date received by ARC CPO……………………..

 

 

Summary of Incident/Poor Practice (please provide details where known)

 

Location…………………………………………………………………………………

 

Details of incident……………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………….……..

………………………………………………………………………………………….

………………………………………………………………………………………..

………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

Date of Incident………………………………Witnessed by………………………..

 

Contact Details……………………………………………………………………..

(of witness)

…………………………………………………………………………………….

……………………………………………………………………………………..

 

 

 

Action taken………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………….

……………………………………………………………………………………….

………………………………………………………………………………………

 

External Agencies Contacted

(Please provide name, contact number, advice received and contact date)

 

Police …………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………..

…………………………………………………………………………………………

 

Social Services………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………..

…………………………………………………………………………………….

Other………………………………………………………………………………

(eg NSPCC)

………………………………………………………………………………………….

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

 

Signed………………………………………………. Date…………………………….

 

 

 

Young and Vulnerable Person Protection. Referral and Information Form

 

Additional Information Regarding Other Alleged Victims

Or Young Persons Concerned

 

Case Name…………………………………………………………………….

 

Completed by ……………………………………………. Date…………………….

 

Name of Alleged Victim/ Young person Concerned………………………………..

(If more than one, use Additional Information Form )

 

Age………………………………………………. Date of Birth………………….

(At time of incident)

Role/Position…………………………………….  Any Disabilities……………….

 

Gender   Male     Female                                         Ethnic Background………………

                                                                                    (if known)

Contact……………………………………………Telephone No ……………………..

(Name and address of parent/carer)

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

ARC Member Club……………………………………………………………………

 

Name of person who originated concern and contact details…………………………

(if applicable /known)

……………………………………………………………………………………….

 

Relationship to alleged victim ……………Relationship to accused………………

__________________________________________________________________ 

 

 Name of Alleged Victim/ Young person Concerned………………………………..

(If more than one, use Additional Information Form )

 

Age………………………………………………. Date of Birth………………….

(At time of incident)

Role/Position…………………………………….  Any Disabilities……………….

 

Gender   Male     Female                                         Ethnic Background………………

                                                                                    (if known)

Contact……………………………………………Telephone No ……………………..

(Name and address of parent/carer)

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

ARC Member Club……………………………………………………………………

 

Name of person who originated concern and contact details…………………………

(if applicable /known)

……………………………………………………………………………………….

 

Relationship to alleged victim ……………Relationship to accused………………

 

Attachments included    Yes    No

 

 

For Completion by the ARC Child Protection Officer

 

Case Name ……………………………………………………………………..

 

Initial Action Recommended or Taken ……………………………………….

…………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………..

………………………………………………………………………………

 

Time frames Agreed /Proposed ……………………………………………..

 

Additional Comments………………………………………………………..

……………………………………………………………………………….

……………………………………………………………………………..

 

Action Taken ……………………………………………………………..

……………………………………………………………………………..

………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………….

……………………………………………………………………………

 

Prime Concern

 

                           Sexual        Physical         Emotional        Neglect       Bullying

Actual

 

Potential

 

Signed…………………………………………….. Date………………………….

 

Print Name…………………………………………